Names for girls of great women in history

When choosing the name of our baby, we look for different sources of inspiration, and without a doubt, the characters in the story play an important role. Many women have made their mark in history with their bravery and courage to make their way, especially in difficult times when women were undervalued.

We bring you names of great women in history , among which you can find scientists, writers, poets, actresses, politicians, activists and more women who fought to leave a better world.

  • Ada, by Ada Lovelace (1815–1852): British mathematician and writer, the only daughter of the poet Lord Byron. She is considered to be the first computer programmer.
  • Agustina, by Agustina de Aragón (1786-1857): she was a defender of Zaragoza during the Sieges, in the Spanish War of Independence.
  • Alfonsina, by Alfonsina Strada (1891-1959): She was an Italian cyclist, the first woman to compete in men’s races.
  • Amanda, by Amanda Jones (1835-1914) – Was an American author and inventor, best known for inventing a vacuum canning method called the Jones Process.
  • Amelia, by Amelia Earhart (1897 -1937) was an American aviator, famous for being the first woman to cross the Atlantic Ocean flying an airplane.
  • Anne, by Anne Boleyn (1501-1536): Queen consort of England, is the image of a romantic victim, a tenacious and beautiful woman who was destroyed by her husband. She was executed on charges of adultery, incest and treason, after a debatable trial and was the mother of the powerful Queen Elizabeth I, one of the most important monarchs in British history.
  • Angela, by Angela Burdett-Coutts (1814–1906): the first woman to be awarded a suo jure title of nobility for her merits in philanthropic work.
  • Alejandra, by Alejandra Romanov (1872-1918): she was the empress consort of the last Tsar Nicholas II. She was the granddaughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and was the last Tsarina, with a tragic end when she was murdered along with her husband and five children. In 2000 the Orthodox Church decided to canonize her as Saint Alexandra Bearer of the Passion.
  • Artemisia, by Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653): Italian baroque painter who at 17 had already painted several masterpieces.
  • Astrid, by Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002): Swedish writer who created the literary character Pippi Longstocking.
  • Benazir, by Benazir Bhutto (1953-2007): Pakistani politician, was the first woman to be elected Prime Minister of a Muslim country.
  • Bessie, by Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman (1892-1926): She was the first African-American female pilot and the first person of African-American and Native American descent to obtain an international pilot’s license.
  • Carlota, by Carlota Corday (1768 – 1793) was one of the key figures in the French Revolution, famous for killing Marat, a Jacobin.
  • Carolina, by Caroline Herschel (1750 – 1848): German astronomer who was the first woman to discover a comet.
  • Catalina, for Catalina de Aragón ( 1485-1536): she was Queen of England and is considered the first ambassador in history.
  • Cleopatra, for Cleopatra (69-30 BC) was the last queen of Ancient Egypt and with her also ended the Ptolemaic dynasty and the Hellenistic era of Egypt. Her love for Marco Antonio occupies entire chapters in the chronicle of humanity.
  • Clara, by Clara Campoamor (1881 – 1972): she was one of the promoters of women’s suffrage in Spain, achieved in 1931, and a convinced feminist.
  • Coco, by Coco Channel (1883-1971: Gabrielle Chanel became one of the most innovative designers to this day. Chanel dared to take traditionally masculine garments and redesign them for the benefit of women.
  • Cora, by Cora Coralina (1889-1985): she was a Brazilian poet, considered one of the greatest of the 20th century in the Portuguese language.
  • Diana, for Diana of Wales (1961-1997): first wife of the heir to the British Crown. He has conquered the whole world for his personality, and after his tragic death he became a true myth and a very popular character worldwide.
  • Dolores, by Dolores Ibárruri (1895-1989): known as La Pasionaria, a communist leader symbol of the republican resistance of the Civil War. To his political action, he joined the fight for women’s rights.
  • Elena, by Elena of Constantinople (250-330): Roman empress and, later, proclaimed like saint of the Catholic, Lutheran and Orthodox Churches.
  • Eleonora, by Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962): She was an American diplomat and human rights activist. She was the first American lady and wife of the President of the United States, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. She is considered one of the most influential leaders in the 20th century.
  • Emelina, by Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928): English activist, was the leader of the British suffrage movement, an influential figure in the expansion of women’s voting rights in Europe and other parts of the world.
  • Emma, by Emma Goldman (1869-1940): Lithuanian writer and anarchist of Jewish origin, she was one of the pioneers in the struggle for the emancipation of women.
  • Eugenia de Montijo (1826-1920): she was a Spanish aristocrat and empress consort of the French as the wife of Napoleon III.
  • Eva, by Eva Perón (1919-1952): she was an Argentine political leader and actress who promoted the women’s suffrage law (1947) and was very active in the struggles for social and labor rights.
  • Faustina, for Empress Faustina (125-175): Roman empress consort third wife of Emperor Constantius II.
  • Flavia, by Flavia Máxima Constancia (361-383) Roman empress consort, wife of Emperor Gratian of the Western Roman Empire.
  • Florence, by Florence Nightingale (1820-1910): British nurse, writer and statistician, considered the forerunner of modern professional nursing and creator of the first conceptual model of nursing.
  • Frida, by Frida Kahlo (1907-1954): Mexican painter, one of the most famous artists in history and the most illustrious Mexican historical figure in the entire world.
  • Gabriela, by Gabriela Mistral (1889-1957): Chilean poet, professor and diplomat, who received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1945. She was the first Ibero-American woman and the second Latin American person to receive a Nobel Prize.
  • Gala, by Gala Dalí (1894-1982) was a surrealist artist and muse to her husbands Paul Éluard and Salvador Dalí with whom she was the co-author of numerous works.
  • Gertrudis, by Gertrude B. Elion (1918-1999): Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1988, her medications made organ transplantation possible.
  • Grace, by Grace Kelly (1929-1982): Oscar-winning American film actress, and later Princess Consort of Monaco by her marriage to Prince Raniero III. It is considered one of the myths of the industry and one of the most recognized divas in the history of cinema.
  • Guillermina by William Fleming (1857-1911): American astronomer who, without having very sophisticated means, came to catalog more than ten thousand stars.
  • Hedy, by Hedy Lamarr (1914-200): was an Austrian film actress and inventor. She was the inventor of the first version of the spread spectrum that would allow long-distance wireless communications.
  • Helena, by Hellen Keller (1880-1968): American deafblind writer, speaker, and political activist. At 19 months he suffered a serious illness that caused total loss of vision and hearing. Keller became a prominent activist and philanthropist who promoted women’s suffrage, workers’ rights, and the fight for the rights of people with disabilities.
  • Hypatia, by Hypatia of Alexandria (350 / 370-415): is one of the most remembered female historical figures today. She is the first female mathematician to have solid records of, and she also made relevant contributions in the fields of astronomy and philosophy.
  • Indira, by Indira Gandhi (1917-1984): first woman from India to hold the position of Prime Minister of her country. Considered a national hero and India’s second longest-serving prime minister, she earned the nickname “the Asian iron lady.”
  • Irene, by Irene of Athens (752-803): Empress of Byzantium famous for her beauty, wife of Emperor Leo IV and mother of Constantine VI.
  • Isabel, by Isabel La Católica (1451-1504): Together with her husband, Fernando II of Aragon, they were known as the Catholic Monarchs. Under his mandate the reconquest was completed and Columbus discovered America.
  • Isabella, by Isabella Bird (1831-1904): one of the greatest travelers of the 19th century. Explorer, writer, photographer and nature lover, she had the honor of being the first woman to be elected as a member of the Royal Geographical Society.
  • Jackie, by Jacqueline Kennedy (1929-1994): wife of President John F. Kennedy and first lady of the United States, considered an icon of elegance and distinguished style.
  • Jana, by Jane Goodall (1934-): primatologist, ethologist, anthropologist and messenger of peace of the English UN and considered the greatest expert on chimpanzees.
  • Jeanne, by Jeanne Baret (1740-1807): She was recognized as the first woman to sail around the world.
  • Josefina, by Josefina de Beauharnais (1763-1814): was the first wife of Napoleon Bonaparte and therefore Empress of France.
  • Juana, by Joan of Arc (1412-1431): also known as the Maiden of Orleans, she was a French heroine, soldier and saint who at the age of 17 led the French royal army. She was convicted of heresy and burned at the stake.
  • Julia, for the daughter of Julius Caesar (54 BC): wife of Pompey the Great, who died after giving birth.
  • Laura, by Laura Bassi (1711-1778): Italian philosopher, professor and scientist who opened a private laboratory, which became famous throughout Europe and welcomed renowned scientists and young people destined to be famous.
  • Eleanor, by Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122–1204): a wealthy aristocrat of great importance in the medieval history of France and England.
  • Lola, for Lola Flores (1923-1995): nicknamed La Faraona, she was a singer, flamenco dancer and actress, a figure of extraordinary popularity in Spain and Latin America.
  • Lucia, by Lucy Montgomery (1975-): Canadian writer, novelist and teacher, recognized for the series of novels “Anne of Green Gables” and worthy of the Order of the British Empire.
  • Luisa, by Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888): She was an American writer, recognized for her famous novel Little Women (1868).
  • Lisa, by Lise Meitner (1878-1968): Austrian physicist who researched radioactivity and nuclear physics, was part of the team that discovered nuclear fission.
  • Mae, by Mae Jemison (1956-): NASA engineer, physician, and astronaut. She was the first African American woman to travel into space.
  • Malala Yousafzai (1997-): is a student, activist in favor of civil rights. Winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014 at the age of seventeen, she became the youngest person to win that prize at any time.
  • Manal, by Manal Al Sharif (1979-): Computer scientist and women’s rights activist from Saudi Arabia, who helped start a campaign for women’s rights to drive.
  • Marie, for Marie Antoinette (1755-1793): she was one of the most important characters in the history of France and Europe. She was sentenced to death by guillotine for treason, and her execution was one of the most important events of the French Revolution.
  • Marie, by Marie Curie (1867-1934): she was a Polish scientist, nationalized French, a pioneer in the field of radioactivity. She was the first person to receive two Nobel prizes in different specialties (Physics and Chemistry) and the first woman to hold the post of professor at the University of Paris.
  • Margarita, by Mata Hari (1876-1917): was a famous dancer, actress and spy, sentenced to death for espionage during the First World War. The word matahari means, in the Malay language, sun and literally “eye of the day”.
  • Marilina, by Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962): She was a Hollywood celebrity of the fifties and is one of the most popular characters of the 20th century. The American film actress is considered a pop icon and a sex symbol.
  • Martina, by Martina Bergman-Österberg (1849-1915), a pioneer of women’s sport, pioneered the teaching of physical education as a complete subject within the English school curriculum.
  • Mary, by Mary Anning (1799-1847): British fossil collector and dealer, recognized as the first paleontologist.
  • Matilde, by Matilde Montoya (1859-1939): she was the first Mexican woman to achieve the academic degree of doctor in 1887.
  • Maya, by Maya Angelou (1928-2014): American writer, poet, singer and civil rights activist, was an example of resilience and love for life.
  • Melba, by Melba Liston (1926-1999): American jazz trombonist and composer, she was the first trombonist to join a big band.
  • Micaela, by Micaela Bastidas (1744-1781): she was a hero of the Spanish-American independence, she played an important role in the history of Peru.
  • Mileva, by Mileva Maric-Einstein (1875-1940): Albert Einstein’s first wife, was a great mathematician and there are those who claim that she had a lot to do with the development of the Theory of Relativity.
  • Minerva, by Minerva Mirabal (1926-1960): she was a Dominican lawyer and activist, and one of the sisters assassinated during the dictatorship of Rafael Leónidas Trujillo. Minerva was one of the first women to obtain a law degree during the dictatorship.
  • Miriam, by Miriam Makeba (1932-2008) also known as Mama Africa, was a South African singer and human rights activist, an icon in the fight against racism and apartheid in South Africa.
  • Nadia, by Nadia Comaneci (1961-): a former Romanian gymnast who won nine Olympic medals, five of which were gold. She was also the first gymnast to obtain a ten-point rating in an Olympic artistic gymnastics competition.
  • Nancy, by Nancy Wake (1912-2011): served as a British spy during the end of WWII.
  • Nicole, by Nicole-Reine Lepaute (1723-1788): French astronomer who is credited with very exact calculations of the dates on which Halley’s Comet passes close to Earth’s orbit.
  • Nina, by Nina Simone (1933-2003): American singer, songwriter and pianist, she was one of the souls of jazz and activism in the 1960s.
  • Olympia, by Olympe de Gouges (1748-1793): is the pseudonym of Marie Gouze, French writer, playwright and political philosopher, author of the Declaration of the Rights of Women and Citizens (1791). Like other feminists of her time, she was an abolitionist. Arrested for her defense of the Girondists, she was tried and was guillotined to death.
  • Rita, by Rita Hayworth (1918-1987) : one of the most iconic and glamorous actresses of the golden age of American cinema and the ultimate Hollywood diva of the 1940s.
  • Rosa, by Rosa Parks (1913-2005): She was an African-American activist who peacefully refused to give her place on the bus to a white man in the United States. Thus the spark was lit that would lead to nonviolent protests in favor of the civil rights of African Americans.
  • Rosalinda, by Rosalind Franklin (1920–1958): British chemist and crystallographer was one of four researchers who discovered the molecular structure of DNA in 1953.
  • Ruth, by Ruth Elizabeth Harkness (1900-1947): She was an American fashion designer, who traveled to China in 1936 and brought the first living giant panda to the United States, not in a cage or on a leash, but wrapped in her arms.
  • Sara, by Sarah Breedlove (1867-1919): American entrepreneur and activist, considered the first African-American woman to become a millionaire in the United States.
  • Sibila, by María Sibylla Merian (1647-1717): she was a German naturalist, explorer and painter, currently considered one of the most important initiators of modern entomology, thanks to her detailed observations and descriptions, with her own illustrations, of metamorphosis of butterflies.
  • Simone, by Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986): was a French writer, teacher and philosopher, defender of human rights and feminist. He wrote novels, essays, biographies, and monographs on political, social, and philosophical topics. She was a partner of fellow philosopher Jean Paul Sartre.
  • Sina, by Ibn Sina or Avicenna : (980-1037): historical figure is a key figure in the history of medicine, since he wrote the medical encyclopedia called “Canon of Medicine”, whose influence would be fundamental in the universities of Europe during the Middle Ages.
  • Sissi, for Sissi Empress (1837-1898): she was a Bavarian princess known for having been Empress of Austria and turned into legend for being a rebellious woman, obsessed with beauty, and whose life was marked by tragedy.
  • Sonia, Sonja Henie (1912-1969): three-time Olympic ice skating champion, ten-time world champion, and six-time European champion.
  • Tamara, by Tamara de Lempicka (1898-1980): Polish painter, who rose to fame in Europe, especially in France and the United States with her portraits and art deco nudes. She was one of the freest women of her time .
  • Theodora, for the Empress Theodora (497-548): She was the most influential and powerful woman in the history of the Byzantine Empire.
  • Teresa, for Mother Teresa of Calcutta (1910-1997): She was a Catholic nun of Albanian origin who worked with the poor in the Indian city of Calcutta. He helped the outcasts of society, primarily the sick, the poor, and the homeless.
  • Valentina, by Valentina Tereshkova (1937-): Russian engineer and cosmonaut who became the first woman to travel into space.
  • Vera, by Vera Atkins (1908-2000): intelligence officer in the British Secret Service during World War II.
  • Victoria, for Queen Victoria (1819-1901): Ascended to the throne at the age of eighteen and held it for 63 years, 7 months and 2 days, the second longest reign in the history of the United Kingdom, surpassed only by the of his great-great-granddaughter Isabel II.
  • Virginia, by Virginia Woolf (1882-1941): She was a British novelist, essayist, letter writer, editor, feminist and short story writer, considered one of the most prominent figures of 20th century literary modernism.
  • Yoko, by Yoko Ono (1933-) Japanese conceptual artist, widow and muse of John Lennon.
  • Zaha, by Zaha Hadid (1950-2016): She was an Anglo-Iraqi architect, coming from the current of deconstructivism, who went down in history as the first woman to receive the Pritzker Prize for architecture in 2004.

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